What passages in Micah and Isaiah are practically identical?

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The prophets Micah and Isaiah wrote practically identical passages that appeared in their books:

Micah 4:1-3

Now it shall come to pass in the latter days
That the mountain of the Lord’s house
Shall be established on the top of the mountains,
And shall be exalted above the hills;
And peoples shall flow to it.
Many nations shall come and say,
“Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,
To the house of the God of Jacob;
He will teach us His ways,
And we shall walk in His paths.”
For out of Zion the law shall go forth,
And the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.
He shall judge between many peoples,
And rebuke strong nations afar off;
They shall beat their swords into plowshares,
And their spears into pruning hooks;
Nation shall not lift up sword against nation,
Neither shall they learn war anymore.

Isaiah 2:2-4

Now it shall come to pass in the latter days
That the mountain of the Lord’s house
Shall be established on the top of the mountains,
And shall be exalted above the hills;
And all nations shall flow to it.
Many people shall come and say,
“Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,
To the house of the God of Jacob;
He will teach us His ways,
And we shall walk in His paths.”
For out of Zion shall go forth the law,
And the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.
He shall judge between the nations,
And rebuke many people;
They shall beat their swords into plowshares,
And their spears into pruning hooks;
Nation shall not lift up sword against nation,
Neither shall they learn war anymore.

Almost identical

The two passages in Micah and Isaiah are very similar. And the differences are insignificant, such as the switch of the words “people” and “nations.” And the addition in Micah of the phrase “afar off” and of the word “strong.” Some of the order of words and oral reconstruction in the KJV show differences in translation but the Hebrew text remains the same. For example, the words “come” (Micah 4:2) and “go” (Isaiah 2:3) translate the identical Hebrew word, halak, which means both “to come” and “to go,” and the meaning relies upon the translator’s comprehension of the verses.

A message of hope

Micah and Isaiah were contemporaries (Micah 1:1; Isaiah 1:1). But it is not known whether Micah quoted Isaiah or Isaiah Micah, whether both quoted another Bible author, or whether each was divinely inspired as he wrote these verses. But one thing is sure that these passages are part of the Old Testament passages that offer inspiring hope for the New Testament church, as they did for the God’s ancient people to whom they were first given.

After the announcement of judgement and destruction upon Zion (Micah 3:12), the prophets of God gave messages of hope and restoration. God’s promise was thus confirmed. It was assured because God’s faithful character was its guarantee (Micah 4:4).

Unfortunately, the failure of the Jews prevented the fulfillment of these events to the literal nation of Israel. But thankfully, God’s plan will now be carried out through God’s spiritual Israel or the Christian Church (Galatians 3:7, 9, 29). Believers from all nations will be coming into God’s kingdom of grace. “Then the King will say to those on His right hand, ‘Come, you blessed of My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world”
(Matthew 25:34). What a glorious day that would be when all the redeemed will be united with God and live eternally in peace with Him.

In His service,

BibleAsk Team

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