Is the Greek word for fish spelled as IXOYE in Greek but pronounced as ICHTHYS ?

Automatic Transcript Generated

Speaker 1

Corey is asking. I don’t understand. In Greek, the word for fish is.

Speaker 2

I’m just going to spell it out.

Speaker 1

IXOYE and I-C-H-T-H-S. Is it spelled I-X-O-Y-E in Greek? Not English, but pronounced in English as ictose. Ictuce. I’ve seen it written both ways, but both ways can’t be correct. You don’t write an English word in more ways than one, so which is correct?

Speaker 3

All right, so I’m going to take a shot of answering this one and it’s a good question. I think we all need crash courses on Greek and Hebrew. It really brings the Bible more to life. And Ignorance actually has an acronym standing for titles of Jesus, but at the same time it does mean fish. So let’s go ahead and put up a slide I put together because it’s going to help visualize really what the struggle here is for Corey and why it seems like there might be two words but they mean the same thing. So let’s go ahead and share a screen. So there’s these two words, ignoose, and then there’s this one, ignous. Both mean fish. Why are there two different words? The answer is actually pretty easy. It’s the same word. It’s just one is in the Greek capital letters and the other one is in the Greek lowercase letters. And in Greek the letters are way different than at times in our letters. The very last letter down below doesn’t really look like it’s capital letter at all. Or you look at that fourth letter, it looks like it starts off as an English Y and then it becomes like a U with a line in the top.

Speaker 3

It’s the same letter, just capital versus lowercase. So we have Iota, which is sort of like the I that they have in Greek, the X is not actually pronounced like an X as we have, it’s sort of like their ch. SOS and then what Corey was thinking was an O is actually a Th sound, theta. And that one’s the same whether it looks very similar, capital or lowercase and what looked like a Y versus a U or something different. Again, that’s upslon. So that Oo sound, not A-Y-A. Yeah. And finally, the last one which is different than anything we have in our modern language is sigma. And that’s probably where a lot of us in different industries might hear. We hear sigma at times and that is the S sound for them. It’s not an E, it’s not something different, it’s an S. So it’s the same word, excuse standing for fish. And so I hope that makes it more clear. One word, there just different letters, it can get confusing. It really is hard for me even learning Greek alphabet because we really have to learn new symbols and then there are times might be two or three new symbols for each one of those letters.

Speaker 2

I’m amazed that you figure that out because looking at the question, I was.

Speaker 1

Like, that’s an interesting question.

Speaker 2

I don’t know why they’re spelled differently and I have no clue how to pronounce them.

Speaker 4

Yeah, I was going to say that was really cool. And I think that like you’re saying it’s so important that we look back at the Greek, we look back at the Hebrew and even at the Aramaic, I don’t know why. This question kind of reminds me of a question I had about the Book of Daniel in chapter five. Do you remember when there’s a handwriting on the wall and it says teckle tackle many you farston and then later it says, many teckle Perrys? And I was like, Why does it say that? Did God change? Did he miss? Say it the first time you misunderstand it? Because eupharstan and Perry is a very different words. And what I had to go do some research on was that the word eupharsen, it’s the same word, it means divided, but basically euphorsen is the plural, but Perry’s is a singular way of saying it. And I was like, Okay. So it was just kind of interesting. There’s so many things like that in the Bible and just like things in the Greek like you’re showing that can be kind of confusing, but you have to kind of just go back like you’re saying and do a little digging.

Speaker 4

And I think that’s such a beautiful thing about the Bible, is basically like God calls us to dig deep, and when we dig deep, we get beautiful, wonderful treasures out of God’s word and out of God’s law anyway.

Speaker 3

And Corey wasn’t, I think, doing it here, but there’s many people who take mistranslations or things that aren’t perfect translations into English and then create a whole doctrine based off of the English which doesn’t properly capture the idea or might even be technically inaccurate. And it’s just so sad that then people will walk away from the faith or misjudge God because they’re not digging deeper if something’s not making sense to you. Yeah, go back and look at the Greek. Go back and look at the Hebrew and that’s the safest place to establish a doctrine or understanding.

Speaker 4

Yeah, I know, actually that’s so incredibly true and actually reminds me of a question that somebody sent in to us. It was a couple of years ago, but somebody basically asked why was it okay to scourge like a servant girl, basically, if she was sexually abused or something like that in the Bible? And I think it’s Leviticus 1920, where basically it says, whoever lies currently with a woman that is a bond made betrothed to her husband, and not at all redeemed, nor freedom given her, she shall be scourged. And I remember and it said, they shall not be put to death because she was not free. And the person was like, how could a god of love scourge this woman who is basically just sexually assaulted. But the thing is, that word scourge, there is a different word. It doesn’t mean to beat like other parts of the Bible, like in New Testament says Jesus was scorched, like he was beaten. It’s actually a word that’s only used in that one instance. It doesn’t mean to be, it means to investigate. And so what the word, how it should have been translated, it’s just the old English scourge meant to investigate.

Speaker 4

And so it meant that the judges needed to look into this case and see what exactly happened because this obviously wasn’t right. And so it’s been slightly a better translation for modern times. You would see that, oh, God is a God of justice and he was righteous in the justice and that he was saying God’s law was saying to investigate when something bad happened, not to punish somebody who was a victim. So I totally agree with what you’re saying. I think again, we have to go back to the original language, go back and do that research and you see a beautiful character of God. I think much more clearly when you do that.

Speaker 3

Amen. I just learned something new. I don’t even know about the explanation of scourge.

Speaker 4

Yeah, yeah, it’s weird. It’s just in that one instance again, blue letter Bible. I’m telling you, I love that.

Speaker 3

I was just thinking we need to plug it again. Definitely. Everybody use blue letter Bible. It has the option called an interlinear view that you can see the Greek or Hebrew word, how it translates into English, and then you can even click on that, get definitions, understand how the grammar works. It is so helpful. You don’t need to pay the hundreds of thousands of dollars that pastors pay to use the Logos program.

Speaker 4

Yeah, good stuff.

Speaker 3

I was thinking maybe we should do like a fundraiser or something like that for blue letter Bible at some point. Best apps ever.

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