If someone rejects Jesus, will he go to hell right away?

Author: BibleAsk Team


Automatic Transcript Generated:

Speaker 1

So Robert is asking, if someone rejects Jesus, then will he go to hell right away? And again, Robert, excellent question. We know this is something that no doubt many, many people are struggling with, worried about grappling with. We know from our documentary on mental health and working on that, that there’s just so many people who are suffering in anguish, even to the point of depression and things like this because of their feeling of uncertainty. They’re feeling that they’re condemned and that they don’t have hope.

Speaker 1

So what is their allotment? What can they hope for? So first, let’s start with one of our favorite verses here at Bible ask. That is two Peter 39. And it reads, I’m reading from the NIV, actually, to be specific.

Speaker 1

It reads, the Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead, he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance. So this is showing us God’s heart. This is God’s intention. This is where he wants us to be.

Speaker 1

God doesn’t want anybody lost. God is in our camp. God is trying to win us over. He’s doing all he can to make that possible. And it’s not that it’s necessarily extremely hard and difficult to be saved, but what’s so hard and difficult is resisting our urges, resisting the temptations, resisting the natural flow that we are now brought and raised into, and being willing to align ourselves with God in his way.

Speaker 1

That goes against the grain. That’s different than what we might see everybody else doing. It might require faith and trust and believing God and not listening to all the other false voices that are out there. And so that requires getting to know God, really building that relationship and trusting him. And God gives us time for that again, he’s patient and he’s not going to try to kill anybody the moment they decide to reject Christ.

Speaker 1

And there’s many stories where people have rejected him, and ultimately God waits for them to come back. Think of the story of the prodigal Son who takes his inheritance, says Goodbye to his dad and just goes off. And he humiliated his dad in a way that most people would say the dad should have the son killed if he ever comes back. Just like we tend to think that God will kill anybody who ever turns their back on him. But no, God is constantly wooing us back.

Speaker 1

If you go and look at the story of Israel, ancient Israel, constantly there’s this back and forth that they reject God, go to other fake gods, worship idols, all these sort of things, and God sends a prophet after prophet after prophet, trying to woo them back. Now, practically, what happens, though, if someone has lived a whole life in rejection of God, even up to the last moment? So let’s say now they die, what happens? Hebrews six. Sorry.

Speaker 1

Hebrews nine, verse 27, gives us the answer. It says, and it is appointed for man to die once, but after this, the judgment. So we have our lifetime to decide to be with God and align with him and do what he wants us to do and be like he wants us to be cooperating with him. And again, it’s not doing those things that save us, but aligning our heart with his heart, that trajectory and being in position where if God brought us into heaven, it wouldn’t be hell for us. That’s what’s important.

Speaker 1

Have we gotten to that state before we perish? Then what happens next? Isaiah 14, verse 15 is a verse that if we read the King James version, we might get the wrong idea. It says, yet thou shalt be brought down to hell, to the sides of the pit. But if you look at the NKJV, which we have up there on the screen, it says, yet you should be brought down to Sheol, to the lowest depths of the pit.

Speaker 1

This is one reason why I’m not a huge fan of the King James version, at least every single verse in it. Because there’s times like this where there’s this hebrew word shiol, and it’s really referring to the grave, that when people die, they’re buried, they then are in shiol. It’s just like how God created out of the dust. We then return back to the dust, and where do we go? Well, that’s shiol, that’s the grave, that’s the pit, in a sense, that earth and death becomes this holding cell for us.

Speaker 1

And there’s verses like that where it’s sort of comparing it to deep sleep, to being in, like, a prison state. It’s not that we’re conscious or anything like that. It’s just the dead. They’re no longer thinking. They’ve ceased to think, and God has them in that holding bank.

Speaker 1

And until the second coming, or, sorry, not second coming, until the events that we see in revelation 20, this is at the end of the millennium. Revelation 20, verse 13. It says, the sea gave up the dead who were in it, and death and Hades delivered up the dead who were in them. So notice Hades there. The same thing for the Hebrews when translating into Greek, they know instead of saying shiol, they say hades.

Speaker 1

So hades again, referring to the grave, where the dead people are, they’re delivered up from the dead and they were judged, each one according to his works. So the wicked are judged at the time of the end of the millennium. And then revelation 20, verse 15, it says, and anyone not found in the book of life was cast into the lake of fire. And then we go back to revelation 14. You’re like, why are we bounced all around?

Speaker 1

Well, revelation is not written chronologically, it’s written in a chiastic structure. It’s like fancy poetry. Revelation 20, verse 14, nav version. It says, then death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire, and the lake of fire is the second death. So people aren’t burning forever and ever and ever.

Speaker 1

They’re burned until they’re totally consumed, they’re gone and they’re totally destroyed, obliterated, never to come back again. That’s the second death. And if you go back and read the Bible, the Bible’s promise again and again and again is that the wages of sin is, remember, what did God promise would happen if Adam and Eve ate from the tree of knowledge of good and evil? He said, you will surely die. The consequence of death of sin is never going to be forever torment.

Speaker 1

It’s going to be death being destroyed, gone. So sin will be completely eliminated. So that is how it. So going back to the question, if someone rejects Jesus, then will he go to hell right away? Answer is no.

Speaker 1

They die, they go to the grave, in a sense, their dust returns to dust, and then they will be resurrected again at the end of the millennium, and then they will face judgment, and then they will be destroyed by the everlasting flames. Now, or better way to put it, is the unquenchable flames. Once these flames start, they’re not going to stop until they burned up everything that they were meant to burn up, the whole earth. The whole globe will be in fact surrounded and burning with fire. And God’s just going to purify earth.

Speaker 1

I mean, just like we heat things up to purify them, God’s going to do the same thing. He’s going to heat up the whole earth, melt away everything. And then if you go to the next chapter, revelation 21, we see God making a new heaven and a new earth.

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In His Service
BibleAsk Team

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