If you were to compare Codex Sinaiticus with today’s Bible how similar would it be?

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Automated Transcript Generated:

Wendy:

Graham is asking: The Codex Sinaiticus Codex is the world’s oldest Bible. If you were to compare and contrast it with the Bible, we have now what would the difference in similarities be?

Tina:

That is a very interesting question, my friend Graham. And to be honest, it’s a little bit some things you’re implying in the question. First of all, what is the Codex Sinaiticus Codex? If I’m not saying it right, please correct me.

Jay:

Sinaiticus. That’s all I’ve heard scholars say it.

Tina:

I’m not a scholar, but I do know what this book is or people call them the Book of Sinai. It’s basically an old manuscript written completely in Greek of basically most of the Bible. And so this book we all just call the Book of Sinai, so I can say it the right way. Basically, it’s all the New Testament, half about half the Old Testament and the Apocrypha, which are these added books that are not really part of the Canon. Now, as far as how it’s similar and how it’s different than the Bible we have today, it kind of depends on which Bible you’re using.

Tina:

I’ll say first, because if you look at the King James Version, for example, there’s a lot of things that are missing in the Book of Sinai as opposed to what we have as the Bible today is the King James Bible. And the reason for this is it’s just missing. I think I read there’s like 14,000 differences between the Book of the Mount of Sinai and the Bible that we basically use today, which like the King James Bible, is taken from the Textus receptors, which is kind of a conglomerate of various manuscripts that were written in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek.

Tina:

Whereas Sinai right book Sinai is only written in Greek. And the reason why people say it was only written in Greek is because it was translated from other books. But the thing is where I have some setbacks between using this as a reliable source is like I said, there’s a lot of things missing. For example, if you go to the story of Jesus’ crucifixion in the Book of Mark, his resurrection is not there. And so that piece is missing, which is a pretty important piece. And I know that in other parts, like in the book of Matthew, it is there.

Tina:

So it doesn’t deny that Jesus resurrected it’s just parts of the story is missing in certain parts of the Bible. But one thing that kind of bothered me a little bit more than a lot of other things is, well, there are also many parts of revelation that are missing, but also in the Book of John, chapter eight, the story of the woman caught in adultery is also missing in the Book of Sinai, which to me that is such a profound and important story as part of the gospel.

Tina:

And so as far as similarities differences. There are some things that are congruent with the Bible we have today, but there’s just a lot of pieces missing. Same thing with the Lord’s Prayer, like the Lord’s Prayer starts with our Father, which are in heaven, but in the Book of Sinai, it just says Father, so it’s missing our Father, which is in heaven. So it’s just kind of these things and it leaves off the ending. It kind of stops, I think, and lead us not into temptation.

Tina:

And that’s it. Whereas in the Bible or the King James version of the Bible we read today, it says lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, for thine is the power and the glory forever and ever Amen. So there are a lot of these things that are missing, but what I think is also kind of disturbing, but they’re missing a lot of good things and also adding the Apocrypha, which is again, not part of the Canon. And I don’t believe that those books are inspired.

Tina:

So I guess it’s a quick summary of some of those differences. But again, there’s like 14,000 differences between the Bible King James Bible that we read today and the Book of Sinai, which I believe was actually found in Syria. So it’s not even really near Mount Sinai or where they believe Sinai to be. But do some research. And I’d love to hear your thoughts on this question. Actually, Jay or Wendy, anything else?

Jay:

Yeah. I mean, I would say that the Codec Synaticus is not without its controversy. To give you an idea of background of the Bible, I often say we need to go back to the original manuscripts and look at those the original language. Look at the original Hebrew. Look at the original Greek. So often when we talk about the Kodak Synetic is a senior said very much. We look at it, especially for the Greek part, especially for the New Testament and the alternatives. The other manuscripts. Another big one is the Codecs Vaticanis that came out of the Vatican.

Jay:

And then we also have the Texas receptacis line. Or you might see Tr for short. And the idea with the Texas receptus line of text, and it’s called the majority text, because one time almost all Bibles most Bibles were based off of the Texas receptive. We don’t have really old Texas receptive documents, but think of it this way that people going out of the Middle East going out of where ancient Christianity was parts of Europe. They make copy after copy after copy after copy in every way that they go to take more copies.

Jay:

And these copies are even used to make Bibles in hundreds of different languages. So we don’t have the original manuscripts. But we have thousands of documents made of copies of copies of copies of these documents, and we’re able to pull them together and see they’re almost all consistent with one another. And with that, you could backtrack it. So I figure out. Okay, there is a consistent lineage, this Texas receptive line, and it’s this Texas line of text that the King James version is based on. Again, we’re talking about the text, especially that’s used for the New Testament.

Jay:

For most of us, that’s where it comes up. I mean, here the pockerfa could be a part of it. But we’re talking about what is the text, the Greek text we use for translating the New Testament. And so King James version uses Texas receptors. You have the other ones. More modern text go with the cooler, older Texas Vaticanas and Texas Texas Sonata. So that’s giving you a background. Why do we care about these? And then there’s completely different there’s, like, the Masoretic text that is the Hebrew text that a lot of Bibles use for the Hebrew part.

Jay:

Sorry. What were you going to say Tina?

Tina:

Tina, my only thought on that is as much as this Copace and Atticus. I’m not saying it right. It is older, but that doesn’t necessarily make it more accurate. Just because if you think about it, if you had a book in your house that you read all the time, it would wear out a lot faster. Whereas there’s a book you’re like, this is not a great book. You put on the shelf and it sits there. It stays in Mint condition because you never touch it.

Jay:

Do we know who wrote it? How trustworthy were they? What was their source? Do you go with the one tax that’s oldest and everything as far as we know? Or do you go with the one that a lineage of thousands and thousands of texts that together are really consistent with each other. So that’s kind of where the issue goes. Yeah. Older isn’t always better. That is a logical fallacy. And there actually is some controversy about how old the Texas really is. The.

Wendy:

The Codex Sinaiticus?

Jay:

What did they call it? Texas? The Texas. Okay, the Codex Sinaiticus. We don’t really know for sure. I mean, shortly after it was discovered by this guy, Constantine Tissendorf, there was another person who came forward and say, hey, no, this was like a junk manuscript I wrote. And this thing is not brand new.

Tina:

They found it like the 1980s, didn’t they?

Jay:

No more like.

Tina:

No, I’m sorry.

Jay:

Something else, late 1800, I think when it happened. But, yeah, supposedly he found … Constantine … He was at the place at Mount Sinai, where there’s the monks hang or that sort of thing.

Tina:

Monastery?

Jay:

Monastery!

Jay:

It’s kind of like a monastery. And he said he found people there. They’re on the verge of, like burning these pieces of paper that had the language on it. So interesting story, no matter what. But, yeah, I think what you said, ultimately, the distinctions are kind of minor. You could still get the whole gospel out of whatever you use.

Tina:

Yeah, but like you’re saying, I think let’s take something that has the whole picture and that’s from trusted sources. So that’s probably the better version. But anyway, let’s keep going. You talk about this all day.

Jay:

Yeah, I could go even further. Like, why is there more in the version to use for the King James version? That’s an interesting story, too. Yeah.


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