How did the patriarch Jacob become the father of the Israelites and the Samaritans?

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Speaker 1

Okay, so Steph is asking how did the patriarch Jacob become the father of the Israelites and the Samaritans?

Speaker 2

Great question. And yeah, you often hear people talk about these things, but I don’t think you’ll average. Here a pastor give you a sermon on how do we end up with descendants of Jacob ending up as Samaritans. So let’s dive into that. And first let’s look at one kings eleven, starting up verse 28. Sorry, no, let’s jump to verse 30. And to give a little bit of context, this is during the time of King Solomon’s reign, and Solomon was a brutal king. We hear about how wise he was, but he was very tough on the people and he was sinning, doing terrible things which he later came to repent of, but he paid a price for that, and actually all of Israel paid a price for that. The twelve tribes of Israel end up being torn apart and we see that again as one kings eleven, starting at verse 30. Then a Hydra, who was a prophet, took hold of a new garment that was on him and tore it in twelve pieces. And he said to Jeremboham, take for yourself ten pieces, for thus the Lord, the king of Israel, behold, I will tear the kingdom out of the hand of Solomon and give ten tribes to you.

Speaker 2

So Jeremboh became the first king of the ten tribes that became called Israel. And then David’s descendants were ruling what became known as Judah. So he had Judah and Israel for a period of time, for a couple of hundred years or so. And Jerembolham became a wicked, wicked king. And God cut short his lineage, brought forth a new lineage, a lineage of this guy called Omari. Let’s look at him. First king 16, 23, 24. In the 31st year of ASA, king of Judah, omari became king over Israel and reigned twelve years, six years he ran in Torza and he brought the hill of Samaria from Shemmer for two talents of silver. So knows that he bought the hill of Samaria. Then he built on the hill and called the name of the city, which he built, Samaria, after the name of Shemmer, the owner of the hill. So this is now where Samaria comes into the picture. So Omari, one of the great kings of Israel, of those ten tribes that split, he buys this hill of Samaria and then sort of builds the capital of Israel there. So Samaria becomes sort of like this buzzword now for these ten tribes in this northern region of Israel.

Speaker 2

Now flash forward to the end of these ten tribes. Let’s look at second kings 17 versus starting at verse five. So, second kings, chapter 17, let’s look at verse five. And it reads now the king of Assyria went throughout the land and went up to Samaria and besieged it for three years. And in the 9th year of Jose, the king of Assyria took Samaria and carried Israel away to Assyria and place them in Hala and buy the Habor, the river Gazan, and in the cities of the Meds. So this Assyrian king was just concrete countries left and right. And what he would do is he would go into a country, take all the people uproot them, and then spread them out over other countries in US. Let’s say he would come, take Californians, and then put them in Nebraska, and then go to New York and put them in Montana, and put the Montana people in Florida and just mix the match so that you’re destroying the people’s roots, they’re connected to the land, destroying their identity and basically wiping out traces of who these people are. They now become mixed and everything. And that’s what happened.

Speaker 2

We now talk about the lost tribes of Israel because they got taken away and blended with the nations, and we have no idea what come of them. But the story doesn’t end there. Who are these Samaritans now during Jesus time? And why are they treated like second class citizens? So we get that in the same chapter. We’re still in second. Kings, chapter 17. And if we look at verse 24, starting at verse 24, it says, then the king of Assyria brought people from Babylon, Kuth, Ava, Hamas, and from Sephirim and placed them in the cities of Samaria instead of the children of Israel. So he now took people from elsewhere and now put them in Israel, and they took possession of Samaria and dwelt in the cities. And it was so at the beginning of the dwelling there that they did not fear the Lord. Therefore, the Lord sent lions among them, which killed some of them. So they spoke to the king of Israel, saying, the nations whom have removed and placed in the cities of sorry. The nations whom you have removed and placed in the cities of Samaria do not know the rituals of the God of the land.

Speaker 2

So these are superstitious. People believe that different parts of land had different gods ruling over them. So they knew there was this god, Yahweh, who was king over this land. So it says, therefore, he sent lions among them, and indeed they are killing them because they do not know the rituals of the God of the land. So then the king of Assyria command is saying, send there one of the priests whom you brought from there. Let him go and dwell there and let him teach them the rituals of the God of the land. Then one of the priests whom they had carried away from Samaria came and dwelt in Bethel and taught them how they should fear the Lord. So you have these non Israelites now inhabiting Samaria, but an Israelite priest who knows God knows Jehovah, is sent there to teach them about Jehovah. So they get a bit of the religion, the New Testament religion, coming to play, but if you keep reading that chapter, they don’t go all the way. They sort of become a mixture of their former pagan practices and a bit of the Israelite practices. So they’re not Jewish.

Speaker 2

They do not have a full Jewish religion. They’re kind of these impostors, in a sense, with a semi related religion. And the Jews were like, we don’t want to have anything to do with you. That’s how the Samaritans sort of trace to Jacob. But yeah, by the time you get to Jesus’time, they’re not really descendants of Jacob. All right, Tina, thoughts?

Speaker 3

You get a thumbs up. That was really good. Good summation of all that. A lot of history there, for sure.

Speaker 2

It’s so fascinating. I love the history of it is.

Speaker 3

That’S the thing with the Bible is, like, at face value, it’s amazing, but the deeper you study and the more you learn, the more you’re like, wow, this is an inspired book. This is supernatural. Like, how in depth and beautiful and just the layers that you just keep finding of truth and beautiful things in there. So I’m very grateful for that. The Bible never gets boring. I’ve studied it. We’ve all studied for a long time and so can find new and more beautiful things.

Speaker 2

Exactly. It keeps going and going. Amen.

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