God drowned the disobedient in Noah’s day. Is baptism a symbol of God drowning us for disobedience?

Automatic Transcript Generated

Speaker 1

Okay, so Robert is asking, what was the purpose of baptism? I heard it was because in Noah’s day, there was no law. They were drowned for disobedience. And Second Peter, Jesus, to set the captives free, he was drowned for their disobedience. And when he came up, he fulfilled their disobedience, but some of them were safe. He fulfilled the law for us. We get that size symbolically for our disobedience.

Speaker 2

Robert, you’re not far off in some ways, and great picking up the drowning and the water symbology a lot of people blow right past it. And I think even imagine when they’re being baptized that they’re being baptized in dirt. But again, I think really the water is intentional and touch a little bit. But first, let’s look at that verse you’re talking about. First, Peter three, starting at verse 18. And it reads, for Christ also suffered once for sins. So Christ suffered once the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God being put to death in the flesh, but made alive by the Spirit, by whom also he went and preached to the spirits in prison. So how about the Holy Spirit preached to the spirits in prison who formerly were disobedient, when once the divine long suffering waited in the days of Noah. So even though we’re talking about God being long suffering, god was long suffering and waited in the days of Noah. So these spirits were back in the times of the days of Noah while the ark was being prepared. So God was patient with people while the ark is being prepared, in which few that is, eight souls were saved through water.

Speaker 2

So the whole time Noah’s building the ark, he’s preaching, he’s trying to share the word, the Holy Spirit, in a sense, working through Noah as the prophet, and they are not listening to him. But God’s waiting gives him over 100 years to get on that boat, and only eight did. And then they end up in prison. I’ll talk about that. There is also an anti type which now saves us baptism. So this is verse 21. Not the removal of filth from the flesh does not take in a bath, but it’s the answer of a good conscience toward God that’s the baptism that saved the answer of a good conscience towards God through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has gone into the heavens and is at the right hand of God angels and authorities and powers having been made subject to him. So what is the preaching of spirits and so much, in fact, you’re tough verse for a lot of people, but what are these spirits in prison? Genesis six. I think this is a key verse to sort of Peggy, what we’re talking about. It says, and the Lord said, my spirit will not strive with man forever.

Speaker 2

So God’s spirit, God’s spirit is telling us right here, god is referring to his spirit with regard to the people during the time of the flood, just before the flood. He is indeed flesh man, yet his day shall be 120 years. And we explain another video that’s referring to not have the lifespan of people, but more likely referring to the time 120 years when Noah is building the art and preaching. And we see in two Peter two five, it refers to what Noah did. It says, and did not the ancient world, but saved sorry, god did not spare the ancient world, but saved Noah, one of eight people, a preacher of righteousness. So Noah was a preacher. Noah is speaking, and when a prophet speaks, prophet speaking with the assistant of the Holy Spirit, that’s how God often speaks through his prophets. What’s this prison, though? How did spirits get in prison? Well, let’s look at Zechariah 911. It says for you, because of the blood of my covenant with you, I will free your prisoners from the waterless pit. Prisoners in the waterless pit? What is it talking about? Isaiah 24 21 to 22.

Speaker 2

It shall come to pass in that day that the Lord will punish on high the host of exalted ones, and on the earth, the kings of the earth, they will be gathered together as the prisoners are gathered in the pit, and will be shot up in the prison. After many days, they will be punished. So I think the key here is to understand what’s the pit. And if you look at Psalm 30, verse three, it says, for example, oh Lord, you brought my soul up from the grave. You have kept me alive, that I should not go down into the pit. And this is what we call Hebrew parallelism Hebrews. Say the same thing twice, but a different way each time, and you have it again with verse nine of Psalm 30. Sorry, what profit is there in my blood when I go down into the pit? Will the dust craze you? Will it declare your truth? Proverbs 112, let us swallow them alive. Like sheil. That’s another word that gets translated, hell. But that’s place of the dead, the grave and whole, like those who go down to the pit. Big, shoal, brave, death, all sort of the same.

Speaker 2

And then when you come to Revelation 2013, what do you know? The sea. Revelation 2013, the sea gave up the dead who were in it, and then death in Hades, the grave delivered up the dead who were in them. And people were judged according to the works. So there aren’t these spirits floating around and then Jesus dies and goes and speaks to them. And I know there’s a very common view, and it’s easy to see that. But when we really understand the language of the Bible, how the Bible uses terms consistently within it, we see the gray. These souls are dead. They’re in prison waiting to be raised after the thousand years, when then they will be judged. The thousand years we see in Revelation 20. But meanwhile, they’re just in a holding bank and not this question. Okay, we have another question. We got to talk about the spirit. What is the spirit and goes up to heaven? But spirit is just breath? Almost any translation, I would say it should be spirit. Sorry, not spirit. Should be breath. And when we look at breath, breath, breath, I think get a better understanding of how things work.

Speaker 2

Even the Holy Spirit that we talk about, that word for spirit is the same word for breath or something like the holy wind, holy moving air. So what’s up with the water? I mentioned it just before, but Genesis one, verses one to two, we see in the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth. Earth was without form and void, and darkness was on the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. This is how the Bible begins. And this is the motif that we see continuing even up to the Book of Revelation. If you understand this, if you bear in mind when you see deep, when you see words like waters often pointing back to this before God created anything, the chaos, the entropy, if you use a scientific word, just unformed. And ultimately this is the ultimate state of death, right? Just being completely unwound and done, gone, obliterated, spread out, what have you. So to have this imagery associated with baptism to me is really interesting. It’s coming back to this. It’s going back to this is like a time of creation and now being recreated, being a new creation in Christ, going back to one Peter 321 to 22.

Speaker 2

There is also an antique which now saves us baptism. Not the removal of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God. We’re not responding to the spirit, so we’re now responding to the Spirit with a good conscience. This is what we’re called to do. And then we have an example where Noah believe God’s warning. Noah obeyed. He built the ark. Noah built the ark out of faith. And when the time came, he entered the ark and then stayed in it until the flood. The flood. He was warning everybody bound, and they were mocking him, probably like, you’re crazy, it never rained. We’re not going to have a flood. What are you talking about? So he looked like a total lunatic, but he kept his eyes on Christ. His conscience was acting. He was responding to God. And so we have in Hebrews one seven, by faith, Noah, being divinely warned of things not yet seen, moved with Godly fear, prepared an ark for the saving of his household, by which he condemned the world and became the heir of the righteousness, which is according to faith. Now, what was not spare from the experience of the flood, but God preserved him through the experience, and that is baptism.

Speaker 2

And if you look at Matthew 20, verses 21 to 23, jesus talked to some of his disciples that says, are you willing to be baptized with the baptism that I’m going to be baptized with? He said yes, we will. He says, Indeed, you will drink my cup and be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with. So he’s saying that there’s an experience. Baptism is also an experience you go through. And it’s interesting that the word baptism itself means immersed. It’s not a little sprinkling, it’s not a little dabbling, it’s not just dipping your toe into the pool. It is emerging. You’re like completely going down. You’re being dunked, and then you emerge out of the waters. New, change, different. And so this is how baptism was for Noah. This is how baptism was for God’s people, the Hebrews, when he made them a nation, pulling them out of Egypt and crossing the Red Sea. So this is a very common concept that gets repeated throughout the Bible. Again, again. And and when you realize this motif, these common symbols, all of a sudden now you’re going to see things you never saw before, and now things are going to click like you’ve never seen before, including how you interpret the Book of Revelation.

Speaker 2

What’s the significance of this beast that comes out of the sea? I tell you, this is big. I wish I had more time to go into it, but keep exploring these things. Baptism is one of the most amazing symbols that just stretches across so many concepts in the Bible. It encompasses the Gospel itself, and I encourage you to continue studying it. And I hope this was a blessing for you. Tina, any thoughts?

Speaker 3

Yeah, I guess my only thought, I think that was really good as far as just showing all the symbolism in baptism and Noah’s love. I mean, it’s a really deep study for sure. And I just look at the question and my brother who’s asking Robert, is saying basically, would any of those people who died in the flood be saved? And I don’t know if that really got answered. My answer to that would be probably no, because it says the world that was then perished. And that’s the same word that you see in John 316, for God to love the world, that whosoever believes in him, just like Noah believed to the saving of his house, would not perish. And that word perish means to be destroyed, lost. So the option was get in the ark and live. Don’t get in the ark and perish and so be lost. Not just your physical body, but also, I believe, your salvation, because these people were completely disobedient, as the thoughts of their heart were only evil continually. So it was only Noah and his family that were saved. And I don’t think any of the people at that time were saved as far as salvation wise because they could see the Garden of Eden, they saw the angel guarding the door.

Speaker 3

They were in full and complete utter rebellion. It wasn’t like they didn’t know or they kind of whatever. They heard the message preached for 120 years and they saw the garden and they saw the angel and they still said, no, I want to do things my way. And they rejected God and God pleaded with them as far as long as he could until he said, okay, I’m sorry. And that’s why the flood is so important for us to understand not just as part of baptism, but also as a symbol for the end of the world.

Speaker 2

Yeah, and that’s a good point. Thanks for clarifying that. Because people think maybe there’s verse stands for the chances, for the promise that there’s second chances and you’re dead or your spirit and then you could get minister to get reformed and then you’ll get resurrected again. But that’s not what the Bible is saying. Bible saying? Yeah, as you said. So clearly these people were preached to, they did have the opportunity to accept the gospel and they rejected salvation. They did not have faith and it’s by faith that the just shall live.

Speaker 3

Yeah, all I right think we might have time for one last question because I think we’re just about time. I know I can answer this one like 90 seconds. You can tell me.

Speaker 1

Let’s do it. So Walter is asking, was Adam and Eve married?

Speaker 3

Walter, that is a very good question because I know it doesn’t say that there’s a wedding feast and who would be there and who would be the priest or the pastor to marry them. But the Bible is very clear in Genesis chapter two, that indeed, yes, Adam and Eve were married. If you go to Genesis chapter two, verses 23 through 25, I think this answers it pretty clear. It says and Adam said this well, basically in 22 is where God created Eve out of the rib. And in verse 23 and Adam said when he saw her, this is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh. She shall be called a woman because she was taken out of man. In verse 24 says, therefore shall a man leave his father and mother and shall cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh. And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed. So yes, very clearly it doesn’t talk about a wedding service or anything, but it’s very clear that Eve was Adam’s wife. So they were indeed married. And you might think, well then who officiated it?

Speaker 3

Well, I think Jesus kind of implied this as well in Matthew 19 when he talks about he kind of reiterates these verses. If you read in Matthew chapter 19 and verses four to six, basically the context is that the Pharisees were trying to tempt him about divorce and so Jesus answered and said unto them in verse four, have you not read that? He which made them at the beginning, made them male and female, and said, for this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife, and they shall be one flesh, wherefore they are no more trained but one flesh. Therefore God, what God has joined together, let no man put asunder. So basically, God is the one that put Adam and Eve together. God would have been basically their pastor, their officiate of the first wedding of creation, which, honestly, I think that’s pretty amazing. I had a great pastor. My husband and I both had a really great connection, too, that married us, and we have an amazing story. But if God was my wedding, that would have been really cool. So, yes, Adam and Eve were married and God officiated the first wedding because that is his design.

Speaker 2

And he was a matchmaker, too.

Speaker 3

Yeah, God is the best matchmaker. He’s the best officiat. He’s just all in all, I think that’s pretty cool. So if you’re praying or I know that sometimes people are like, we’re Adam and Eve really married, so do we really need to have an official wedding? I think that’s kind of what begs the question, because some people think, like, well, Adam and Eve didn’t have a paperwork or whatever to show that they were married. And I think sometimes that kind of comes up. But I would say if you’re going to get married to somebody, do it legally, do it officially, don’t play games. It’s more than just a we’re together. No. Make it legal, make it public, make it something that’s committed.

For the full episode:
https://youtu.be/oYjD3gfHuHI

Share this video with a friend:
https://youtu.be/uSfYW_V2hPc

In His Service
BibleAsk Team