Did Judas really betray Jesus? Bible accounts seem contradictory

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Did Judas really betray Jesus?

Speaker 1

So David asks part One of Six I am having a problem with two seemingly contradictory Bible passages dealing with the arrest of Jesus in the garden. One, Jesus was betrayed by Judas, and while he he yet spake load, Judas one of the twelve came, and with him a great multitude with swords and staves from the chief priests and elders of the people. Now he that betrayed him gave them a sign saying, whomsoever I shall kiss? That same as he hold him fast. And fourth with he came to Jesus, and said Hale mastered and kissed him. And Jesus said unto him, Friend, wherefore art thou come? Then came they, and laid hands on Jesus, and took him. Matthew 26 47 to 50. The same story was repeated here and while he had spoken, behold a multitude. And he that was called Judas one of the twelve went before them, and drew near unto Jesus to kiss him. But Jesus said unto him, Judas, Judas, petraeus thou the Son of man, with a kiss. Luke 22 47 to 48 and immediately while he yet spake Judas one of those twelve, and with him a great multitude with swords and spades from the chief priests and the scribes of the elders.

Speaker 1

And he that betrayed him had given them to a token, saying, whomsoever I shall kiss that same as he take him, and lead him away safely. And as soon as he was coming, he goes straight, straight away to him, and said, and saith, Master and kissed him. And they laid their hands on him, and took him. Mark 1443 to 46. So there is no doubt that the Scripture stated that Christ was betrayed by Judas. However, when you get to the Gospel of John, Judas did not betray Jesus. As a matter of fact, Jesus deliberately revealed himself to those who came to arrest him, as shown here. Judas then, having received a band of men and officers from the chief priests and Pharisees, cometh thither with lanterns and torches and weapons. Jesus therefore knowing all things that should come upon him, went forth and said unto them, Whom seek ye? They answered him. Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus saith unto them, I am he. And Judas also, which betrayed him, stood with them as soon than as he had said unto them, I am he. They went backward and fell to the ground, then asked them again, Whom seeki?

Speaker 1

And they said Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus answered, I have told you that I am he if therefore ye seek me, let these go their way. John 18 three to eight and one more slide. All right. Above passage suggests that although Judas brought the men who arrested him, it was Jesus himself who revealed himself to be arrested. He was not pointed out by Judas. Can you help shed some light on this? Thank you so very much. David.

Speaker 2

All right, David. Great question. And I know this type of thing a lot of people struggle with hope. I could come onto the screen in a moment here. There we go. All right. So this is a common issue a lot of people see in the Bible, and some people get turned off by it. They think, oh, I can’t believe in the Bible now because the Bible is contradicting itself. But is that really the case? First, I want to put up a principle of how we should interpret the Bible. This comes from Jesus himself, and I say it’s one of the most important rules of interpretation. And this comes from John 1035. And Jesus says that scripture cannot be broken. And what he’s saying is the Bible is true and don’t read verses in a way that says the Bible is wrong. We need to read the Bible in a way that suggests it’s coherent. And I’m not saying we got to force this interpretation. Every single time I struggle with these issues and I worked through it, the Bible ended up being right and my initial inclinations were wrong. So examples of this is like in the book of Genesis.

Speaker 2

There are two creation accounts and some people say, oh, these are completely contradictory, we can’t believe them. But if you go back and look at them, they’re approaching it from a different angle. It’s a different side of the story, a different way, presenting the information. They’re not inconsistent, they’re just from a different approach. And we see differences at times. When the Book of Deuteronomy compare that to things in Exodus, it might be the same account but said a little bit differently. Kings and chronicles, there are stories there where there’s slight differences between them. And then. Of course. The famous example a lot of people talk about and we’ve touched on before here is the Gospels. How it looks like the Gospels might be inconsistent. But those differences are so minor and that there are people like Lee Strobel. Who was an atheist and really going and challenging the Bible and comes out concluding the Bible is the most believable book ever because of these inconsistencies or they’re one of these factors. It gives more credibility because you’re having eyewitness accounts, I believe, influenced a bit by the Holy Spirit. Got it by Holy Spirit. But there should be some differences, right?

Speaker 2

There should be some nuances here. If everybody has the same wording, same exact account, they’re going to say, okay, they clearly check their notes and the Bible is not believable. Now, how do we reconcile this story? How do we make sense of John’s account seeming to be a bit different than the others? I want to start off with first. Matthew 26, verse 48. This is key. This is a critical verse for unlocking everything. And it reads, now his betrayer. This is referring to Judas had given them a sign, the chief elders, the army giving them a sign saying, whomever I kiss, he is the one sees him. So there’s a plan in place ahead of time. And the agreement is these guys don’t make a move and don’t arrest Jesus until Judas goes and kisses him because they’re not 100% sure who Jesus is and who’s the right guy. I mean, this isn’t like modern times where we watch TV and we can know celebrity’s face really well, right? It’s different times. And they have this deal again with Judas and Judas has a special role and the sign is the plan of attack is when Judas kisses that person, that’s when we move in and we’re going to arrest Jesus.

Speaker 2

Right? So that’s the agreement. That’s the plan. So we come to then John and if that’s the plan we see in John, then that Judas shows up, he has these people also come with Judas and then Jesus does declare he is God and glory shines. They fall backwards and a couple of times Jesus is saying yes, I’m the one, let my disciples go, let them go. But you know what? They’re not moving. They haven’t advanced yet in on him. So they’re still afraid to go in. And it’s not until then Judas actually steps up and kisses Jesus that then they actually do move in and arrest Jesus. So this is a way that you can combine the three or four accounts and they’re 100% consistent. They’re not inconsistent. If we understand there’s that sequence of events and Luke and Mark and Matthew wanting to feature stern elements of that sequence of events and John is wanting to pull out his own special sequence. John’s whole book is really emphasizing the divinity, the godship of Jesus. And so he focuses on that scene where the glory shines and people are freaking out and Jesus is looking otherworldly.

Speaker 2

He wants to emphasize that part of it. He doesn’t so much care about the part of Judas coming and kissing him. The other people want to more emphasize that part. So they’re not a consistent. So I hope this is helpful. Give me an idea of how that sequence of events plays out. And really all these gospels can be read coherently.

Speaker 1

Wanted to add to that too. You think about it, in that day and age it was actually not uncommon for kings and nobility and people in power to have somebody else pretend to be them and to say like if they’re in battle or something, they might have someone who is low on the infantry line be dressing as the king. So that when the opposing party attacked, they would go for the one that looked like the king and claimed to be the king, but wasn’t actually the king.

Speaker 2

Yeah, I think there’s a Bible stories where that sort of happens. Was that king hezekiah tina that did that.

Speaker 3

I want to say something similar happening with King Saul, but I could be I’m a little foggy, but the idea.

Speaker 1

There is that in here. Why are they waiting to know who judith is going to kiss because Jesus is saying, I am he. But for all they know, it could be somebody pretending to be Jesus.

Speaker 2

Yeah, exactly. So you got all these men here, they’re, like, wish for, do we arrest jesus says, Let them go. You want me? And, yeah, the guard is like, Is this really the guy, though? We don’t know yet. And Judith is still standing there.

Speaker 1

They would absolutely expect that in this situation, the enemy would not just identify themselves. They would expect that it would be a substitute, someone filling in, because in the way they operate, the power dynamics that they operate with, the one in charge would not just identify themselves that way. They’d have somebody else doing that. And that’s one of the things that really differentiates Jesus character, is he’s like he’s very forthcoming and he’s like, I am. Even in the threat of death, even in the literal threat of death, the real threat not just a threat. He is saying, I am he. You came for me.

Speaker 2

Yeah.

Speaker 1

Here I am. I’m yours. Take me.

Speaker 3

Jesus cannot lie. It goes back to that verse, god cannot lie. Things. Titus one too. And I think that’s a really good perspective of when it comes to the Gospels. There’s a reason why God wanted four Gospels, because one time I wrote a paper about the four Gospels and I started basically saying that it’s like there was a car accident in an intersection of the street, and, like, John, James, Luke and Matthew each have a perspective on one of those four corners, except for John seemed to be looking out in the distance. And so I do see that unique perspective of John in the angle that he’s looking at, his perception of the life of Christ and his ministry.

Speaker 2

He’s exactly how it is. I think these trouble uses examples of, like, a court case. Exactly. All right, maybe we should do some shout outs. We have Diana joining us. And Merry Christmas to you. And HEPA Sabbath and Olivia, welcome.

Speaker 3

Merry Christmas.

Speaker 2

Yeah, merry Christmas.

Speaker 3

Merry Christmas to you too, fatty. Merry, merry Christmas. I know not everybody celebrates Christmas, but if you do, we want to wish you a merry Christmas and pray you’re blessed with you and all of your loved ones.

Speaker 2

And if you’re just joining us, let us know you’re here. If you have questions, please drop them in the chat. We love to answer them on the fly and really make this live show, actually. So please say hi. Let’s know you’re here.

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